Potential Screw up of All Screw Ups!!! AND Lesson for Everyone!!!!

Lincoln LS

  1. 04_Sport_LS

    04_Sport_LS Dedicated LVC Member

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    I think you mean Murphy's Law, (anything that can go wrong...will).

    Normally... I would agree with you, that getting everything out of the way is best.

    However... those PS hose seals can be very problematic, so I personally would prefer not to disturb them. They are too easy to roll, twist, tear... and generally fark up.

    It might be best to use tie wire or coat hangers to suspend the pump up and out of the way. Then compare the bolt holes to the diagram above and focus on getting the bracket mounted. If you have to... remove the airbox completely... and drain and pull the PS reservoir first.
     
  2. 04_Sport_LS

    04_Sport_LS Dedicated LVC Member

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    And don't forget to put the belt behind the tensioner... before you tighten down the tensioner.
     
  3. rgorke

    rgorke Well-Known LVC Member

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    I couldn’t get the pressure line loose so, I just got it in without taking the pump out. Getting the bolts in and tight really wasn’t bad at all. What was bad was getting the power steering pump back on. I had the front two bolts in and then had to take them out again because there wasn’t enough clearance to get the rear bolts in. Ugh!!!

    Then they all kept sliding out and onto the ground before I could get them started...

    Of course I didn’t see your post until after I got the tensioner on and torqued...which leads me to: which is it?

    8A73686A-A66C-47E3-9A66-231EAF2DF26D.jpeg

    64C9214F-28B0-410D-AAB1-24928E251111.jpeg
     
  4. 04_Sport_LS

    04_Sport_LS Dedicated LVC Member

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    30 lb-ft for the V 8
     
  5. 04_Sport_LS

    04_Sport_LS Dedicated LVC Member

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    See post#17. That is direct from my 2004 manual.

    The V 6 is 37 lb-ft. Probably because the block is steel instead of aluminum.
     
  6. milehighmikey

    milehighmikey Dedicated LVC Member

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    I'm pretty sure that the V6 block is also aluminum, but you have triggered my self doubt mechanism now! lol!
     
  7. 04_Sport_LS

    04_Sport_LS Dedicated LVC Member

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    I believe the V6 is the same Dura Tech block used in the escape, and Taurus, and others.
     
  8. 04_Sport_LS

    04_Sport_LS Dedicated LVC Member

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    I know the V6 weighs more... but don't remember how much.

    Thus the reason for the heavier sway bar and front springs.
     
  9. FDR

    FDR Dedicated LVC Member

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    Duratecs are aluminum. My Taurus had that, the DOHC 3.0. The other engine at the time was the Vulcan 3.0 pushrod, which was iron. I don't think the Escape had the Vulcan, but the Windstar did along with other models

    The Duratec30 and AJ V8s both seem to be very close in the high 300lbs range (365 and 375, respectively), though I don't have a good source. I figured it was either a balance/CoM difference or tuned a little more towards their assumed owners' demographics
     
  10. 04_Sport_LS

    04_Sport_LS Dedicated LVC Member

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    Well I do know that the Escape uses a cast iron block version of the Duratech. Maybe the LS is different.

    I dont dont think Ford would increase sway bar size, and front coil spring ratings for 10 pounds.

    But I have been wrong before
     
  11. rgorke

    rgorke Well-Known LVC Member

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    Yeah, I know...those are two pictures from the 2004 manual...one is from the section related to the accessory drive, the other is the section for the engine assembly. Two different numbers in same manual.

    I did 30! And, since I couldn't get my torque wrench in the space for the bracket, I used my SO stubby 3/8" and got it as tight as I could...With that wrench, there is no way I can get over 20lbs with that wrench.
     
  12. 04_Sport_LS

    04_Sport_LS Dedicated LVC Member

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    Yup. Seems the V6 in the LS is an all aluminum Jaguar version of the Duratech.
     
  13. rgorke

    rgorke Well-Known LVC Member

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    So...I got it put back together! As I mentioned before, the bracket went on fairly easily, much easier than getting it out. The PITA was getting the PS pump bolts in w/o them sliding out and onto the ground. I was very paranoid and only used finger strength until the bolts were well threaded in. For the lower bolts, I used a socket and extension by hand. The tensioner went on smoothly as well and torqued!!! Yeah, that was the issue all along.

    I had emptied the PS reservoir and refilled that and did the back and forth 10 times, per the manual. No whining or other noises.

    Bleeding the cooling system went as expected. What is interesting is that the 2004 manual is a little different than the on-line version...One key thing is to make sure the degas bottle cap is on or the coolant one puts in at the fill point just goes to the degas. Mine nearly overflowed until I put the cap on. DUH!

    All in all, a successful, albeit irritating repair.

    Other fun stuff:

    I noticed some nicks in my AC pulley...I then remembered the project to remove the sway bar bushings and using a dremel to cut through the stock mounts to put new ones on...a few slips of the dremel and the pulley was nicked...OOPS!!!

    When putting the lower hose back on, I was able to lock open one of the large clamps. The other large one popped off my hose clamp tool and landed 15 feet away in a big bush!
     
  14. 04_Sport_LS

    04_Sport_LS Dedicated LVC Member

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    Working on an LS is never dull... is it???;)
     
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    • milehighmikey

      milehighmikey Dedicated LVC Member

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      Nice work! I bought a thread repair tool kit that has both taps and dies that are not really taps and dies, they just clean up threads on bolts or nuts or threaded parts on engines. If a nut or bolt meets any resistance, I oil it up and use the chasing tools on them. Had this happen on one ball joint on the Subaru I was caring for yesterday. Nut was going on right, but couldn't make it past 1 turn. After the chaser tools, I was able to hand thread it all the way. Great tools for what they do! And yes, a tap or die can do this, but are also capable of cutting new threads and thereby ruining the parts you are trying to repair.

      As for the LS V6, when I changed my engine, I recall looking at the used block and telling myself that I just didn't have the time to sell it as scrap, but its aluminum block seemed like quite a few used beer cans worth of Al.
       
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      • rgorke

        rgorke Well-Known LVC Member

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        My buddy who is a real full time professional type mechanic came by and tried to do as you described. What makes the PS/tensioner bracket tricky is that the threads start 1/8" into the whole. So, his tap just threaded that part and wasn't able to "fix" the deeper part that is actually threaded. If that makes any sense.

        I was really bummed until we looked and saw that it was actually a bracket and the manual confirmed it. I will try and post a picture.
         
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        • jerryg2112

          jerryg2112 Active LVC Member

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          One trick I have been using for years that I swear by is making your own thread chaser. If you have an extra bolt with the same thread that you want to chase then use it. If not you can use the bolt that is going in. Take it to the grinder and grind one or two flutes in it just like on a tap. Just modify about 3 threads. You can also use a dremel or die grinder. You are looking for a sharp leading edge on the thread. Make sure you are not cross threading when starting and since you are only cleaning up the threads you shouldn't be using too much force or something is amiss. Much better than stopping and going to the store to buy a tap you don't have. Also good for cleaning the bottom of a hole where a regular tap won't cut.
           
        • milehighmikey

          milehighmikey Dedicated LVC Member

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          I have used that and also done a little different where I made longitudinal thin cuts, a la self threading screw theory. But to get to the bottom of a hole, 10 Different Types of Thread Taps [Definitive Guide] Bottoming tap is the official tool.
           
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