1. num1bigguy

    num1bigguy Active LVC Member

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    I recently had my SES light come on. It is code P0442. I personally just can't run with it. O'Reilly's reported to me this code. I was curious if anyone had somewhere else for me to look, or do I just start throwing gas caps and other parts at it. vehicle is a 2002 Conti. It has 135,000 miles on it and this is the only code pulled for the light. I realize the cap isn't expensive at around $20, but if its not the cause then its $20 wasted. I believe the cap to be the original cap. Thanks in advance as we might be becoming dinosaurs in here!
     
  2. FlaOkie

    FlaOkie Active LVC Member

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    You can go buy a new gas cap and see if it clears the 442 code.
    Or you could take it to someone who can do a smoke test on the whole EVAP system, to check all the hoses and components for a leak.
    I had a small leak code on my ’04 Chrysler – turned out to be a bad reed switch that controlled the canister vent valve.
     
  3. Sincoln

    Sincoln Active LVC Member

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    Gas caps are a wearable item. 135k miles with the factory one at almost 20 years old, it definitely won't hurt having it replaced. My understanding, they can fail one of 2 ways, either they stick open or shut, though sticking shut would probably require a physical failure that locks it in place, and the the car would eventually stall as the volume of gas dropping would create a vacuum and eventually mess with the fuel pump (if I understand it correctly, someone correct if wrong). Sticking OPEN, however, would mean it's constantly pulling air in and constantly leaking air/fumes out, and that will mess with the evap system. If you drive for 15 minutes at a good speed (step on it a few times as you want it to go through some gas) then pull over, and remove the cap. You should hear a swoosh as air enters. No swoosh, it's probably stuck open.

    There are tools that can test a gas cap. Though if you pay to have it tested, the cost to test it will probably be more than just replacing it, and if it's bad, the cost of testing + new cap, will be even more.

    It's smart to replace, then reset the code (pull battery cable or find someone that can reset with a scanner- even cheap scanners can reset) and drive it. If it comes back, start inspecting everything in the evap system, especially missing or broken vacuum connectors, rotted/split vacuum lines, etc..
     
  4. num1bigguy

    num1bigguy Active LVC Member

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    Ultimately it corrected itself and the service engine soon light went out!
     
  5. lsismore

    lsismore LVC Member

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    Can anyone provide any photos or diagrams that show the evap/vacuum lines to check for leaks? I'm getting the P0442 code (Small Evap Leak) as well. I purchased a new gas cap and reset the code but after about a week the code came back. I'd like to do a basic check for any obvious cracks or visible holes in the line(s) but I don't know what lines to look at. I'm guessing I'll end up bringing it in to the shop but I'd at least like to take a crack (pun intended) at it myself before I have to shell out the big bucks.

    Thanks!
     
  6. Sincoln

    Sincoln Active LVC Member

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    I don't have any, but you can start with everything connected to the evap canister. Do ONE hose at a time. Buy it by the foot at a parts store. While at it, you can do ALL vacuum lines under the hood relatively quickly, for under $20. Do the egr vacuum line too.

    Go by AGE and NOT "condition". Vacuum lines can split, rot on a bend, dry rot on a nipple, harden on a nipple and stay expanded/loose, get soft in one spot, etc., all while "looking" OK everywhere else.

    Any leaks (evap or not) being fixed with fresh hose, will help it run better if there are any leaks. Any areas with plastic "T" or couplers or nipples, carefully cut a slit in the hose and remove that way. Pulling on the hose, twisting, etc., can break the plastic, and depending on the what and where, might cause more problems than you'll want to mess with.
     
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    • FlaOkie

      FlaOkie Active LVC Member

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      For $10 to $15 you can get a factory service manual CD.
      A good idea if you are keeping an older car on the road.

      An Evap leak can be very hard to find. You can try yourself, but the best way to find it is to take it to a shop that can do a smoke test up on a lift, and also hook up a diagnostic computer to force/check the operation of the valves and switches in the system.
       
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      • lsismore

        lsismore LVC Member

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        Thanks all for the replies. I called my local shop - they're good guys - and they recommended getting an OEM gas cap before bringing it in. Said that sometimes the off brand caps don't make perfect seals and even a tiny leak could throw a code. Anyone happen to know the part number for an '03 LS V6? This looks right but I want to be sure: NEW OEM FORD LINCOLN MERCURY FUEL FILLER GAS CAP NON LOCKING PUSH XU5Z-9030-JA | eBay
         
      • joegr

        joegr Dedicated LVC Member

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      • FlaOkie

        FlaOkie Active LVC Member

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        A check of my '02 Continental service manual indicates the same part number for the gas cap.
        I don't know anything about the LS, but it appears Ford used that cap on many of it's vehicles.
        Trying an OEM cap is not a bad idea, that just "may" fix the leak.
        If that doesn't fix the problem then its smoke test time.
         

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