3D Models?

Lincoln LS

  1. theophile

    theophile Active LVC Member

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    So I've got a 3D printer now and naturally, I start thinking about how to use it to improve the LS. My CAD/drawing skills are currently sorely lacking so I'm wondering if anyone knows of any sources for 3D models of LS parts. For instance, was there ever some computer software that had the car or its interior rendered in 3D? Maybe some kind of virtual shop manual or something like that? Any other ideas?

    By the same token, if you're a designer and want some assistance with prototyping, let me know.
     
  2. joegr

    joegr Dedicated LVC Member

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    You can be certain there are 3D models of all of it, but you can also be certain that it is very unlikely that we would ever see any of it. It's locked up in engineering departments (Ford, Jaguar, and OEM vendors) under strict non-disclosures.
     
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    • 04_Sport_LS

      04_Sport_LS Dedicated LVC Member

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      If you can pick up a copy of AutoCad somewhere... You might be able to " roll your own " ... But they are usually licensed and expensive.
       
    • joegr

      joegr Dedicated LVC Member

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      I guess that autocad might do 3D now, but SolidWorks would be the way to go. There's also FreeCAD.
       
    • theophile

      theophile Active LVC Member

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      Sure, drawing stuff myself is certainly an option, although one I'm having to work up to. Even something relatively simple like the triangular defroster vent involves a lot of geometry that is difficult to replicate accurately using SketchUp, the only tool I've got any experience using.
       
    • 04_Sport_LS

      04_Sport_LS Dedicated LVC Member

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      For real " hands on " ... and some trial and error... Most dimensions can be figured out with a set of good calipers and a tape measure... And radius can be done with a protractor.

      Also you might want to check out local used book stored for an old Trig math book... If you don't already know it.

      Make up a rough " napkin drawing " and then transfer all dimensions to the program of your choice. You already have the template to go by, just reverse engineer it.
       
    • FeelingFuzzy

      FeelingFuzzy LVC Member

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      My thought is a 3d scanner would be the best for more precise dimensions and certainly for efficiency. Something like this: Matter and Form - 3D Scanning Hardware & Software

      The price may seem a bit high for someone cash strapped but would probably more than make up for it in time savings and accuracy. A little research could also find a better price.

      If doing it as a business I imagine most clients would not have access to 3D models and would need scans done anyway. Therefor an added upcharge opportunity and also would make you more competitive than others just offering 3D printing.
       
    • theophile

      theophile Active LVC Member

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      Have looked at 3D scanners. The consumer-level technology just isn't there yet in terms of the accuracy/value tradeoff. The measuring/drawing route would probably be the most accurate, I just need to learn how to do it. SketchUp is not CAD software and it may just not be very well suited to doing this sort of thing.
       
    • SHORod

      SHORod New LVC Member

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      You may want to check out Tinkercad. It's free and the learning curve is pretty light relative to other more typical CAD packages.

      One of the first projects I modeled using Tinkercad when I got my 3D printer several years ago was the gear for a FoMoCo blend door motor. Just prior to designing that I had one fail with broken teeth and I was looking for a challenge.
      upload_2019-2-13_12-49-17.png
      -Rod
       
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      • Knuckles

        Knuckles New LVC Member

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        Dassault Systems offers an AutoCAD clone for free with a professional version for $$$. The free version is probably akin to AutoCAD Lite. I also have been using FreeCAD although not for 3D printing.
         
      • FDR

        FDR Dedicated LVC Member

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        Solidworks is great, but is also $4000 per license last I checked

        AutoDesk offers Fusion 360, which seems to closely match what I remember from AutoDesk Inventor back in ~2009. It's a subscription-based software (ew), but you can register as an "enthusiast" for free. I got it running yesterday but haven't dug into yet. I use Solidworks at work so I'm definitely interested to see how it stacks up for hobby use. I wouldn't know where to begin modeling a car body in either, so I'm of no help there

        As far as I know, AutoDesk AutoCAD is only 2D. AutoDesk has multiple other 3D offerings (Inventor, Fusion 360, Revit, TinkerCAD, etc)
         
      • FeelingFuzzy

        FeelingFuzzy LVC Member

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        Autodesk Fusion 360 also has a cool library of thousands of projects that can help one self teach through the learning process: Gallery | Fusion360 Gallery
         
      • Knuckles

        Knuckles New LVC Member

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        Geez, $4K for a license. I've been retired for a few years, I used to be a PTC ProE, Wildfire and Creo driver. I seem to recall those licenses being about 10 times that.
        A friend built a sort of home hobby CNC mill and he uses FreeCAD to generate the G-Code. He built it out of MDF, using drawer slides driven by all thread to move in 3 axis. He has arduino (?) stepper motors and drivers, came in a kit I think he told me. He uses a Dremel as the milling cutter. So far he's only machined some plaques in wood.
         
      • joegr

        joegr Dedicated LVC Member

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        Yes, I thought that SolidWorks was a bargain compared to the license fees for the electrical CAD package I use.
         
      • FeelingFuzzy

        FeelingFuzzy LVC Member

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        Technology is moving to the masses at an ever increasing better, more efficient and cost effective rate. The day is coming soon where many auto parts will be offered on a download and print pay structure. It really makes a ton of sense. Warehouses will be in many cases one day shrunk down to tiny datacenters selling print file downloads. There are so many things that self serve 3D printers will solve. For example I could use a little tiny plastic T for the left windshield wiper connection. Some tubing also to the EGR. If I could have a 3D printer at a cost effective rate and could print those exact parts needed for say a $1.99 I would buy that download instantly. Add another $1 for video instructions on install and again I am in. The future is coming fast my friends.
         

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