Replacing the cooling fan pump actuator

Lincoln LS

  1. TomServo92

    TomServo92 Active LVC Member

    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2009
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    OK, I have the actuator and I'm trying to decide on the best way to tackle the job. Is it easier to get to the actuator from above or below? Do I need to remove the hose coming from the reservoir? Any help is appreciated!
     
  2. rt2barbers

    rt2barbers Active LVC Member

    Messages:
    68
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    Location:
    stafford
    actuator

    Serph belt comes off first. Then, syphon the fluid from the reservoir. A little syringe with a vinyl tube can actually be slipped down into the suction line through the reservoir fill opening to get almost all of the oil out. Next, the alternator from below. You have to un-restrain that big line running across the frame and bend it down to get the alternator out......2 clamp points. Then get the large pump return line out of the way. Figure out the actuator electrical connector and remove that. This connector swivels, just for info. Then, with a Torx, don't remember the size, the actuator comes out. Bleed the pump after buttoning up.....a couple of different ways to do this. I prefer removing the reservoir and using the syringe above to keep the pump return line topped off and sucking on the system return while spinning the fan and turning the pump by hand.
     
  3. TomServo92

    TomServo92 Active LVC Member

    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2009
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    So the pump will lose fluid when the actuator comes out?
     
  4. rt2barbers

    rt2barbers Active LVC Member

    Messages:
    68
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    Location:
    stafford
    Actuator

    Good question, Tom. If you can remove the actuator without removing the pump suction line, you may be able to do the job without draining. Just keep a pan handy. Fluid does come out when the part is removed.
     
  5. TomServo92

    TomServo92 Active LVC Member

    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2009
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    OK, got it done. Here's how I did it:

    1. Removed underbody panel to get access to the pump from below.
    2. Removed intake tube to have better access to reservoir.
    3. Siphoned off all the fluid from the reservoir with a turkey baster.
    4. Disconnected the suction line from the reservoir only.
    5. Pushed line out the way of the actuator (used oil drain pan to catch any fluid).
    6. I was able to get a small ratchet with a T-40 bit into the small area behind the pump and broke the actuator loose.
    7. Using a T-40 screwdriver, I removed the actuator from the pump.
    8. Using the wiring harness (note I didn't disconnect it first), I fished the actuator up from above and disconnected it from the harness (where it was much easier).
    9. Reverse steps 1-8 to install new actuator.
    10. Refilled the reservoir with fresh fluid.

    It works like a champ now. Since I didn't let the suction tube or pump lose all of their fluid, there was no need to prime the pump.
     
  6. rt2barbers

    rt2barbers Active LVC Member

    Messages:
    68
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    Location:
    stafford
    Actuator

    Awesome report, Tom. My thanks again to the LS Forum Senior members for guiding me through this repair last summer. Great variation.....disconnecting the electrical above AFTER removing the actuator.
     
  7. TomServo92

    TomServo92 Active LVC Member

    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2009
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Necessity is the mother of invention. I couldn't get it disconnected while still on the pump.
     
  8. rt2barbers

    rt2barbers Active LVC Member

    Messages:
    68
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    Location:
    stafford
    Actuator

    The "Tom" method may be the most efficient and easiest way to do the actuator replacement. If the job can be done with the suction line on the pump, I agree that the bleeding step may be unnecessary considering that the actuator is probably on the pump discharge and fluid may conceivably keep the pumping chamber "loaded."

    Did the new actuator restore fan high-speed capability?
     
  9. TomServo92

    TomServo92 Active LVC Member

    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2009
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Yes, it did. Before I replaced it, the fan was turning but I could barely feel any air movement.
     
  10. TomServo92

    TomServo92 Active LVC Member

    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2009
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    I had to take the LS on a trip today. Over 200 miles in 90 degree heat with the A/C blasting and she didn't miss a beat. It appears my repairs were definitely a success.
     
  11. kitbuf

    kitbuf LVC Member

    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2007
    Location:
    coastal
    actuator

    Tom,

    Thanks for the input on changing the actuator. I used your exact instructions and it worked well. Took less than a hour and yes it also restored my fan to high speed operation. ;)

    Thanks for everyone's input on my overheating issues as they are now taken care off and for a cost of less than $200. Replaced thermostat housing and pump actuator and all is well now.:D

    I just wonder what a dealership would of charged being they would of probably wanted to replace complete pump and fan motor when it only needed an actuator. Does anyone know of a dealership that actually only replaced the actuator to fix the high speed operation of the fan without replacing the whole pump and or fan motor.:rolleyes:
     
  12. lsdarkshadow

    lsdarkshadow Dedicated LVC Member

    Messages:
    569
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2009
    Location:
    Milwaukee
    I hit this up on another thread already but where can you buy an acuator besides the Stealership?
     
  13. TomServo92

    TomServo92 Active LVC Member

    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2009
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    I wasn't able to find it anywhere but a dealership.
     
  14. lsdarkshadow

    lsdarkshadow Dedicated LVC Member

    Messages:
    569
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2009
    Location:
    Milwaukee
    Called Max and the part is enroute. Nice Write up Tom. Gonna help alot!
     
  15. Kool LS

    Kool LS LVC Member

    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    May 12, 2007
    Location:
    Phoenix
    Is there a layman's way to test the fan speed and whether or not it kicks into "high" mode?

    Example: should the fan automatically kick into high speed when you press the A/C on?

    My car is overheating (not on highway) but at stops and suspect the fan or solenoid, etc.


    From the FORD CD:

    Hydraulic Cooling Fan Reservoir

    Reduce the fluid in the reservoir by half.
    Attach the New Generation STAR (NGS) Tester to the vehicle.
    Start the engine and command MAX fan.
    Maintain 2,500 rpm. Fluid should be observed through the reservoir returning. The internal return also functions as a relief valve; fluid must be observed through the sides of the return. If the fluid is not returning through the sides the screen is plugged. If no or little return is observed or the fluid is returning through the pressure relief, install a new reservoir.


    Hydraulic Cooling Fan Motor

    Inspect the fan blade and shroud for any foreign materials. Clear the obstruction and continue the test procedure.
    Rotate the fan to see if any contact between the shroud and blade exists. If contact is observed install a new fan shroud assembly.
    Rotate the fan by hand; the fan should rotate freely (no resistance should be felt, the fan will free wheel with minimum effort). If any resistance is present install a new fan assembly.
    Attempt to move the fan blade and shaft in and out and side to side; if any movement is detected install a new fan assembly.


    Hydraulic Cooling Fan Pump

    WARNING: Do not touch the flowmeter during the test procedure or severe burns and serious injury may occur.

    1. CAUTION: Make sure that the connection point will not interfere with any of the engine accessory drive components or drive belts.

    NOTE: On some vehicles the port may not be easily accessible. The power steering analyzer should then be hooked up at the hydraulic cooling fan motor or at a point in the high pressure line between the motor and the hydraulic cooling fan pump.

    Install the power steering analyzer at the high pressure port of the hydraulic cooling fan pump. Make sure the power steering analyzer gate is fully open.

    2. CAUTION: A noisy fan system must be bled and refilled before proceeding with any of the test procedures. For additional information, refer to Hydraulic Cooling Fan System Filling and Bleeding in this section.

    Check the cooling fan hydraulic fluid level. If necessary, add fluid.

    Use MERCON® Multi-Purpose (ATF) Transmission Fluid XT-2-QDX meeting Ford specification MERCON® or equivalent.
    Remove the reservoir screen and place the dial thermometer in the hydraulic cooling fan reservoir.
    Start the engine and allow the engine to warm up until the fan turns on.
    Allow fluid temperature to reach 74-80°C (165-175°F).
    Record the flow rate and pressure readings.
    7. NOTE: The pressure relief valve will open at 1,050 ± 100 psi (7,240 kPa ± 689.5 kPa). If the pressure is above 1,200 psi (8,275 kPa), a new pump pressure relief valve must be installed.

    Turn the A/C on MAX, and record the flow and pressure readings. The flow and pressure readings should increase.

    If the flow and pressure readings do not increase, install a new hydraulic cooling fan pump.
    Partially close the gate valve to achieve 300 psi (2,068.5 kPa). The flow rate should be 1.65 ±.25 gpm.
    If the flow rate is less than specified, install a new hydraulic cooling fan pump.
     
  16. lsdarkshadow

    lsdarkshadow Dedicated LVC Member

    Messages:
    569
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2009
    Location:
    Milwaukee
    PS.....Replaced the actuator, and wish I had an extra joint in my wrist! Thanks Tom!
     
  17. TomServo92

    TomServo92 Active LVC Member

    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2009
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Sorry I didn't reply to your PM! I've been in the process of moving and haven't had time to log into LVC. Glad you were able to get the actuator replaced and I agree, an extra wrist joint would have been helpful!
     
  18. TomServo92

    TomServo92 Active LVC Member

    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2009
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    BTW, I just noticed your location says "Movin to Houston". That's where I just moved! I'm living in north Houston near The Woodlands.
     
  19. bwv2k

    bwv2k LVC Member

    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2010
    Location:
    high point
    how muchdid the acuator cost at the dealership
     
  20. TomServo92

    TomServo92 Active LVC Member

    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2009
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    I paid $122 w/ tax.
     
  21. Kool LS

    Kool LS LVC Member

    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    May 12, 2007
    Location:
    Phoenix
    Guys, i have a major problem and am stuck and need your help. I was changing out my cooling pump Actuator and part of the old Actuator is still screwed into my Cooling Fan Pump housing. It seems part of the Actuator unscrewed from itself when using a #40 Torx to remove the Actuator. See my photos below.

    Does Anyone have any ideas on how i can get this extra threaded piece of the Actuator out of the pump itself?

    I don't think screwing the old actuator back in and then trying again will help. I thought of trying to take a vice grips to the part still in the pump, but the access to get a vice grips in there is limited.

    Photo #1 shows the Brand new uninstalled Actuator on the Left, the old Actuator on the right (what came out of the car)

    Photo #2 shows the new Actuator on the bottom, the old Actuator on top

    Photo #3 shows the part of the old Actuator still screwed into the pump and sticking out (this is the part missing from the old acuator of photo #1).

    Seems the design of the actuator and how the pieces are both screwed into each almost makes this happen. I'm surprised if nobody else has encountered this yet.

    2000 LS V8 with 160k miles

    IMG_3423.jpg

    IMG_3422.jpg

    IMG_3445c.jpg
     
  22. TomServo92

    TomServo92 Active LVC Member

    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2009
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Wow. I don't even know how to begin tackling that one.
     
  23. lseguy

    lseguy Dedicated LVC Member

    Messages:
    1,786
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2006
    Location:
    EastCoast
    if u were to dremel a slot across the head of what's left in there, would you be able to get an L shaped flat head screwdriver in there to turn it? Or something like this with a flathead on the end?
     
  24. lseguy

    lseguy Dedicated LVC Member

    Messages:
    1,786
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2006
    Location:
    EastCoast
    and is that in there TIGHT. From experience, those flex screwdrivers dont have much torque at all. An L shaped flathead might be the better option?
     
  25. lseguy

    lseguy Dedicated LVC Member

    Messages:
    1,786
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2006
    Location:
    EastCoast
    how did this turn out for you?
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.